Mystery surrounds sale of Chateau Margot Chimney site, land to private developer

first_imgIt is a national heritage site but the Chateau Margot Chimney, which has been around since the 19th century, is in the hands of the private land development company which ordered the gates locked.The Chateau Margot chimneyOver the weekend, concerns were raised about the appearance of a sign on the gate of the site, which stated that it was owned by Nadia Gardens Housing Development Incorporated and directed all queries to RK Security proprietor, Roshan Khan.When this publication contacted Khan on Saturday, he confirmed that the Chateau Margot Chimney was in the hands of the private development company. However, Khan made it clear that they would not deny anyone who wishes to access the chimney for educational or tourism purposes.The sign that now graces the gate leading to the chimney“It is a private development… The land is owned by them. But they normally allow people who want to go in and visit for tourism. But recently, the gates were open for a long time and some guys go in and tried to steal the Chimney blocks. They were using drugs,” Khan claimed.“We will allow access to anyone who wants to enter the compound for tourism, educational purposes, school tours. You just can’t leave the gate open permanently because of criminals, vandals, thieves and delinquents. I’ve just been appointed to stop, control the vandalism and the criminal [trespassing].”National TrustMeanwhile, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the National Trust, Nirvana Persaud also confirmed that the land is in private hands. She acknowledged that the historical landmark is under the Trust’s protection and they maintain the immediate surroundings.“But we do access the site and we do take care of the immediate surroundings of the chimney. Not the entire complex. But the chimney is within private property. Not all heritage sites are owned by the National Trust. Chateau Margot is one such.”It is understood that the Chateau Margot Chimney was built and completed on July 1, 1889. The structure is a well-known landmark that identifies when one has reached Chateau Margot on the East Coast of Demerara.It is all that is left standing of a former sugar factory which, according to an 1883 contemporary description, “boasted the finest cane land in the colony of British Guiana during the nineteenth century, operating successfully on the vacuum pan process for many years.”The chimney itself was constructed by Antonio Gordon, a bricklayer from Buxton and stands on a huge concrete base of red bricks. Besides its industrial function as an important part of the sugar factory, the chimney also served as a beacon to ships approaching Port Georgetown.This is the case even after the factory was demolished, with reports indicating that the structure is still being cited in the Caribbean Shipping Association’s landmarks for Georgetown along with the lighthouse beacon.last_img read more

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An elusive molecule that sparks multiple sclerosis may have been found

first_imgThe brain of a multiple sclerosis patient Mehau Kulyk/Science Source Email By Mitch LeslieOct. 10, 2018 , 2:15 PM To uncover other candidates, immunologists Roland Martin and Mireia Sospedra of University Hospital of Zurich in Switzerland and their colleagues analyzed immune cells known as T cells that came from a patient who died from MS. T cells normally switch on when they encounter protein fragments containing just a few amino acids that belong to an invading microbe, but they also turn on in people who have MS.The researchers wanted to determine which protein shards stimulated the patients’ T cells, so they tested 200 fragment mixtures, each containing 300 billion varieties. The two fragments with the strongest effect turned out to be part of a human enzyme called guanosine diphosphate-L-fucose synthase, which helps cells remodel sugars that are involved in everything from laying down memories to determining our blood type. T cells from 12 of 31 patients who had who either had been diagnosed with MS or had shown early symptoms of the disease also reacted to the enzyme, the researchers report online today in Science Translational Medicine. What’s more, T cells from four of the eight patients tested responded to a bacterial version of the enzyme—lending credence to the recently proposed idea that intestinal bacteria may help spark the disease.But, immunologist Ashutosh Mangalam of The University of Iowa in Iowa City says, “The gut microbiome angle is a bit of a stretch.” Some of the bacteria that produce the enzyme are less abundant in MS patients than in healthy people, he says.Overall, however, “It’s a very well done study” that uses a “very sophisticated technique,” says neuroimmunologist Howard Weiner of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.Although guanosine diphosphate-L-fucose synthase is prevalent in the brain, “it has never been a candidate in the past,” says neuroimmunologist Reinhard Hohlfeld of Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich. The discovery, he says, is “a first step in an interesting new direction.”If guanosine diphosphate-L-fucose synthase turns out to be one of the elusive MS self-antigens, dosing patients with it might tame symptoms such as numbness and muscle weakness in much the same way that allergy shots prevent people from reacting to substances like ragweed pollen, Sospedra says. She and her colleagues plan to start to test this strategy with MS patients next year. 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Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Our immune cells normally pounce on intruding bacteria and viruses. But in multiple sclerosis (MS), immune cells target the nervous system instead. Now, researchers may have pinpointed a long-sought molecule called a self-antigen that provokes these attacks, pointing a way toward potential new treatments.“The work is monumental, and it’s tantalizing,” says neuroimmunologist Hartmut Wekerle of the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Munich, Germany, who wasn’t connected to the research.Researchers have long suspected that a self-antigen—a normal molecule in the body that the immune system mistakenly treats as a threat—can trigger MS. The prime suspects have been proteins in myelin, the nerve insulation that erodes in patients with the disease. But after years of searching, scientists haven’t been able to pinpoint the molecule. An elusive molecule that sparks multiple sclerosis may have been foundlast_img read more

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