Shuttles mini PC with builtin touchscreen doesnt require a monitor

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. The Shuttle D10 PC (right) has a touchscreen display that allows users to monitor their home security system feeds as well as control their entertainment, such as watching TV (left), listening to music, or surfing the Internet. Credit: Shuttle, Inc. But according to Shuttle Inc., the Taiwan-based manufacturer that invented this “small form factor” computer called the D10, the device is intended specifically for the home. The company is highlighting the D10´s usefulness as an entertainment center and home security system that is simple enough for kids and the elderly to use.The D10 eliminates the need for not only the keyboard and mouse, but also the monitor. Shuttle promises that the PC´s graphic user interface allows users to control various multimedia applications in an easy-to-use format. The D10 can connect directly to TVs, and family members can enjoy movies, TV programs, Internet surfing and music using either the touchscreen display or an infrared remote control.The D10´s home security system lets users connect surveillance equipment and software, allowing home owners to monitor rooms and entrances of the house in real-time on the quadrant screen. When away from home, users can access the real-time information online. The dual display allows users to view and control both the entertainment features and the surveillance features simultaneously.The D10 PC comes with the choice of a Core 2 Duo E4000 series, E2000 series, or Celeron 400 series CPU, along with 2GB RAM, four USB ports, and other features.Shuttle plans to make the D10 available by the end of this week in Japan for a price of about 330€ (about $500). There is no word yet on releasing the device in other areas.More information: Shuttle D10via: Dvice and Akihabara News A small PC with an embedded LCD touchscreen may sound like an interesting idea, but you may wonder how practical it would be. Especially when the computer’s 7-inch screen has a resolution of just 800×480, making it difficult to stare at for too long. Citation: Shuttle’s mini PC with built-in touchscreen doesn’t require a monitor (2008, September 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-09-shuttle-mini-pc-built-in-touchscreen.htmllast_img read more

Read More »

Solar camera strap could put an end to dead dSLR batteries

first_img Most digital SLR cameras are powered by lithium-ion batteries that must be plugged into an electrical outlet when they need to be recharged. If the photographer has no spare, a dead battery means the end of the photo shoot.The Solar Camera Strap concept was the brainchild of designer Weng Jie, and consists of a row of tiny flexible solar panels on the strap that enables the camera batteries to be recharging whenever the photographer is shooting in daylight. A storage battery is built into each end of the strap. It is not clear if the solar strap will also be able to charge the battery inside the camera, and it seems likely cameras would need some modification to allow them to be powered by the solar camera strap itself.Similar devices have been considered in the past, but for more power-hungry devices such as smartphones. A solar camera strap may be more successful since the power requirements for modern cameras are very low.The strap is only at the concept stage and is not yet available and there is no word on when or if it will ever be commercialized.Yanko Design is a website focusing on introducing modern designs in a wide range of fields, including interior design, architecture, fashion, and industrial design. Other designs by Weng Jie include “Cornification,” a pillow made of Velcro sweetcorn kernels. Battery Wrapped in Solar Cells Recharges in the Sun Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (PhysOrg.com) — A new concept introduced by Yanko Designs could put an end to dead batteries on photography excursions. The Solar Camera Strap is a sturdy strap to secure the camera and to power it via thin solar panels across the width of the strap.center_img © 2010 PhysOrg.com Citation: Solar camera strap could put an end to dead dSLR batteries (2010, June 29) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-06-solar-camera-dead-dslr-batteries.html More information: www.yankodesign.com/2010/06/25 … ower-around-my-neck/last_img read more

Read More »

Production and shedding of tissues in sponges found to be slower than

first_img Field study suggests sponges creating food for coral reef organisms Journal information: Royal Society Open Science As we humans spew carbon dioxide into the air, the ocean continues to absorb some of it—one of the creatures in the sea that helps make that happen is the sponge. They collectively move carbon in seawater from the water column to the sea floor. Prior research has suggested that sponges are primitive creatures that rapidly produce and shed tissue, which is the means by which they send carbon to the bottom of the sea—the carbon gets into their bodies through pores and channels that the sponges use to filter water. In this new effort, the research pair has found that sponges are more complicated than believed, but they do not move as much carbon to the sea floor as has been thought.To learn more about the role sponges play in ocean carbon transfer, the researchers collected samples off the coast of Vancouver Island and in the Strait of Georgia from 2011 to 2015. They then subjected the samples to a variety of experiments designed to better understand the process by which new cells are produced and dead material is shed.The researchers discovered that cell division, as expected, was part of cell production, but they were surprised to find that some tissue was replaced via stem cells. They found also that the sponges did not shed nearly as much material as other reports have suggested, which they propose was likely due to observers attributing discarded fecal or mucus waste to shedding. Even more surprising, the researchers found that the rate at which cells were produced and discarded was seasonal. During warm summer months, the process moved rather swiftly, but it came to a virtual halt during the cold winter months.The findings suggest that sponges do not move nearly as much carbon as prior research has suggested, which the researchers note could have an impact on climate change models. Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Production and shedding of tissues in sponges found to be slower than believed (2016, November 30) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-11-production-tissues-sponges-slower-believed.htmlcenter_img © 2016 Phys.org (Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the University of Alberta in Canada has found that shedding and production of new tissue in sponges is much more complicated and slower than has been thought. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the researchers describe their multi-year study of sponges, what they found and what their findings might mean for future ocean management. More information: Amanda S. Kahn et al. The role of cell replacement in benthic–pelagic coupling by suspension feeders, Royal Society Open Science (2016). DOI: 10.1098/rsos.160484AbstractBenthic–pelagic coupling through suspension feeders and their detrital pathways is integral to carbon transport in oceans. In food-poor ecosystems however, a novel mechanism of carbon recycling has been proposed that involves direct uptake of dissolved carbon by suspension feeders followed by shedding of cells as particulate carbon. We studied cell replacement rates in a range of cold-water sponge species to determine how universal this mechanism might be. We show that cell replacement rates of feeding epithelia in explants vary from 30 hours up to 7 days, and change during different seasons and life-history stages. We also found that feeding epithelia are not replaced through direct replication but instead arise from a population of stem cells that differentiate and integrate into epithelial tissues. Our results reveal a surprising amount of complexity in the control of cell processes in sponges, with cell turnover depending on environmental conditions and using stem cells as rate-limiting mechanisms. Our results also suggest that for species in cold water with high particulate organic matter, cell turnover is not the mechanism delivering carbon flux to surrounding communities. The freshwater sponge Spongilla lacustris. Credit: Wikipedia/Kirt L. Onthank/CC BY-SA 3.0last_img read more

Read More »

Many students dont know how to study Heres how parents can help

first_imgResearchers and experienced educators have found that often students don’t have good study habits and skills, or that they rely on strategies that don’t work, frequently at the urging of teachers and parents. Busy teachers, however, may not be likely to add those lessons, so it often falls to parents. Nate Kornell, another researcher on the topic and a psychology professor at Williams College in Williamstown, Mass., says helping your child study can be a good opportunity to learn about their coursework, progress and abilities — and a way to get to know them better. “It’s like magic when a kid understands how to study and values learning on a deeper level. And parents can really be involved in that,” he says. Read the whole story: The Washington Post Among the creative and maddening reasons kids come up with for not studying, one familiar one might be worth addressing: They don’t know how. “It is somewhat shocking how many students just don’t know how to do it, which frustrates them and can turn them off to enjoying learning,” says Henry Roediger III, a professor of psychology and brain science at Washington University in St. Louis and co-author of the book “Make It Stick.” “It’s something that needs to be taught in third or fourth grade and reinforced throughout their school years.”last_img read more

Read More »

Capitals date with ghazals

first_imgMusic Aficionados have always had an ear for ghazal and ghazal lovers of Delhi were recently in for a treat when Pakistani singer Attaullah Khan performed ghazal numbers. Bollywood lovers would recall Khan from the 90s hit song Acha Sila Diya Tune which was sung by Sonu Nigam in Bewafa Sanam. The lyrics of the song were written by Khan. Hailing from Punjab in Pakistan, Khan has performed naat and kalaam of famous Sufi poets like Mian Muhammad Baksh’s Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Saiful maluk and Bulleh Shah’s Keey Bay Dardan sang yaree. He has more than 1,000 music albums and has recorded more than 4,000 songs in seven languages.In Delhi, Khan began the evening with his famous song Ae Theve Mundari da Theva. He sang numbers like Acha sila diya tune mere pyar ka, Kameej teri kali and others. ‘Musical and cultural exchange programmes will revive the relationship between India and Pakistan,’ Khan said.last_img read more

Read More »

Saluting the real stars

first_imgTarun Shienh, the real estate guru and CMD Premia Group graced ceremony as the chief guest of honour.Personalities like Kalpana Singh Chitnis(Indo American Poet and Film Maker), Navnit Sikera(IPS), Rohit Bal, Miland Lavate(Finance Investor) Arun Bakshi(singer and actor), Dr.M Wali (Medical), Rajesh Kumar Griha(Environment Scientist ‘C’) were some of the awardees of 2014, who have displayed exceptional work in their respective field and have devoted for the society and the nation. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’The award ceremony was conducted in the presence of honorable celebrities and distinguished personalities. Tarun Shienh gave away the awards for the various social activities.He said, ‘It’s been an honor for me that the foundation has invited me to honor these awardees who are recognized in their respective fields. All these personalities have done remarkable jobs in their respective fields and have set our country on the height of success and honor due to their hard work.  Rajiv Gandhi  was great personality and I pray to the almighty to give peace to the noble soul of our former Prime Minister Late Rajiv Gandhi and bless with divinity of mind and soul’.last_img read more

Read More »

Ponting leads Oz greats in slamming Haddin axing

first_imgAustralia greats Ricky Ponting and Ian Healy say axing wicketkeeper Brad Haddin for the third Ashes Test against England starting on Wednesday is a mistake, while Matthew Hayden called it “outrageous”.Haddin, the vice-captain, has been overlooked in favour of the younger Peter Nevill, who impressed on his international debut in the second Test at Lord’s after the 37-year-old pulled out to be with his sick daughter Mia. Also Read – Khel Ratna for Deepa and Bajrang, Arjuna for JadejaFormer captain Ponting, who played 168 Tests, said the decision did not sit well with him.“I am disappointed with the decision to leave Brad Haddin out of the Test team for Edgbaston,” he said in a column for The Australian newspaper, adding that he was “the heart and soul of the team”.“All reports suggest he would have played at Lord’s but he made the only and right decision to be with his daughter Mia who was very ill in hospital and missed that match. Also Read – Endeavour is to facilitate smooth transition: Shastri“I know it would have been a hard call for him, he has been a single-minded and determined servant of Australian cricket, but he rightfully put his family first and has paid the price for it.“I know he won’t complain about being dropped. He is a tough character but it doesn’t sit right with me.”The decision was made by on-tour selector Rod Marsh, himself one of Australia’s greatest wicketkeepers, and coach Darren Lehmann, according to captain Michael Clarke. Haddin’s daughter reportedly suffers from neuroblastoma — a rare form of cancer that attacks children aged five years or younger.Ponting added that he feared Test cricket was now over for Haddin and “I am a little concerned that the team may miss him more than they expect. I hope I am wrong”. Haddin, who retired from one-day international cricket after helping Australia win the World Cup this year, turns 38 in October with Nevill now seemingly having the chance to make the Test position his own.Former opening batsman Hayden was even more outspoken, questioning the precedent set by selectors.“After the hell he’s gone through it is outrageous that Brad Haddin hasn’t gotten his spot back for the third Ashes Test,” he wrote in a column for news.com.au.“Any mum and dad who has experienced the issues Brad and his wife Karina are going through will understand there’s no way he was in a position to play cricket at Lord’s.last_img read more

Read More »

Creating opportunities for tourism

first_imgAccording to an official at the ministry of tourism, a proposal regarding this was cleared by Mahesh Sharma, the Minister of State for Tourism and Culture recently. Some of the world heritage sites recognised by the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco), like the highly visited Taj Mahal, Agra Fort, and monuments in Khajuraho had free entry, the official said. Salar Jung Museum of Hyderabad along with a few other museums welcomed visitors without entry tickets. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’This was not be applicable in the state of Bihar, the official said. The minister had earlier said that India would also announce the setting up of a medical and wellness board to facilitate foreign tourists for availing quality healthcare services in the country.The union tourism ministry in July said the Foreign Tourist Arrivals (FTAs) in India have registered a 1.8 per cent growth compared to June last year, with the US contributing the highest number of tourists.September 27 has been globally recognised by the UN as World Tourism Day since 1980.With this year’s theme of ‘One billion tourists, one billion opportunities’, the World Tourism Day 2015 emphasised the impact of the sector on economic growth, job creation and development, according to the UN World Tourism Organisation.last_img read more

Read More »

Presidency teachers urge students to withdraw agitation

first_imgKolkata: A group of 36 teachers of the Presidency University has jointly urged the agitating students of the institute to withdraw their 12-day-old stir promising them to monitor renovation work of the Hindu Hostel building. Altogether 50 students have been on an indefinite sit-in at the university campus demanding that they be allowed to stay at the Hindu Hostel which has been on renovation for the past three years. Ayan Chakraborty, an activist of students’ body Independent Consolidation (IC), today said 36 teachers handed over yesterday a joint letter to the agitating students who comprises members of the IC, SFI and a few others who are not affiliated to any union. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life “In the letter, the faculty members urged us to withdraw the movement stating that it is affecting the normal functioning of the institute and promised to monitor the renovation work of the Hindu Hostel,” Ayan said. They requested the students to withdraw the agitation and go back to the rented premises at Newtown, about 18 km away from the university, for the time being. “But we turned down their request to withdraw the sit-in as don’t agree with the teachers’ views that the agitation has been affecting the functioning of the university in any way,” Ayan added. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Mercedes car in Kolkata, 2 pedestrians killed He said, “We are attending classes regularly. We are not disrupting the academic or administrative work. We are just staying at a particular place in the campus.” The students, who have brought pillows and mattress and were taking bath in the campus turning it into a hostel, demand that they be alloted rooms in the Hindu Hostel, which is under renovation. The Hindu Hostel, adjoining the College Street institution, had been shut down for repairs on July 29, 2015 and 150 boarders were shifted to a rented accommodation at New Town, which is around 18 km from the university. The Presidency authorities had last year assured the students that all the six blocks of the hostel would be opened for the boarders after completion of renovation work by the first week of August. Upal Chakrabarti, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and one of those having signed the letter, said the teachers will continue the dialogue process with the students and university authorities. A university spokesman said Vice-Chancellor Anuradha Lohia already explained to the students that the renovation work will take five months to complete and urged them to reconsider their decision. The university hoped the students will understand the situation and cooperate with the authorities, he said.last_img read more

Read More »

The 1962 lessons

first_img50 years after the 1962 Sino-Indian war, in 2012, when much was written and commented in Indian media and some Chinese declassified records became available, United Services Institution of India (USI) took on the task of researching this war, juxtaposing the Chinese and Indian records.A team of officers with a flair for military history, headed by Lt Gen Vinay Shankar (retd), attempted to as he states, “clinically and objectively”, chronicles’ the battles and encounters of the 1962 war, based on an official version of the Chinese government and the synthesis of all that has been reported and written in India and abroad and also the leaked portions of the report of a study by Lt Gen TB Henderson Brooks and Brig (later Lt Gen) P S Bhagat, VC. Also Read – World War I’s forgotten violent aftermath and toxic legacyThe eight chapters of the book are: 1. The Politico-Diplomatic Prelude (1947-62), 2. The Military Campaign, covering Ladakh, the Western Sector  and Kameng, Lohit, Subansiri and Siang Frontier Divisions, the Eastern Sector, 3. The Chinese Air Threat, 4. Public Opinion in the Build-Up to the War, 5. Indian Military Thought: 1947-62, 6. Epilogue, 7. A Road Map to Closure and 8. Tailpiece, which contains some personal reminiscences of the war based on first-hand experiences. It includes two narratives of the prisoners of the Chinese war. These also reflect the trauma of being vanquished in the war.  Also Read – Enid Blyton’s adventures get even more mouth-wateringOf the many battles fought between Indian Army and China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA), during the Sino-Indian war of 1962, two battles-of Walong and Rezang La (la means a mountain pass) – both were fought by battalions of the Kumaon Regiment – merit is mentioned here because both the Kumaonis fought to the last man, last bullet.While such great valour must be highlighted in motivational lectures, in this case, it, unfortunately, reflects very poorly on the government of that day. Because not only was the Indian Army pitched into this war under-clad, under-armed, under-equipped and ill-prepared by the then main political players, Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru and Defence Minister V K Krishna Menon, but they also (a) failed to appreciate the  situation the Chinese threat/intentions, (b) refused to heed the warnings about Chinese movements conveyed to them by senior field commanders, (c) interfered in the military chain of command (d) interfered in tactical decisions and (e) stupidly and stubbornly ordered the Army to undertake tasks for which, apart from deficiencies mentioned, the Army simply did not have the numerical strength of troops. On 12 October, 1962, at Palam Airport before departing on a visit to Colombo, Nehru  insouciantly revealed to the media that he had ordered the Indian Army “to throw the Chinese out”.Referring to the part of Henderson Brooks-Bhagat report, which was leaked out in 2014 by Australian journalist Neville Maxwell, Arun Jaitley had stated: “What has been made public is part-I of the report. It has already been reported in the media but pages 112 to 167 are still not known. Is it because these pages contain some material which can be embarrassing to those in power in 1962? The first 111 pages have been made public, rather than allowing public opinion be influenced by unauthentic sources, it is now necessary to make the balance pages public. The contents of the report also raise some legitimate questions. The military strategy of the then government has been seriously questioned. The intelligence assessment of the Chinese attitude was a flawed one. The military strategy in creating “forward posts” has been criticised as providing to the Chinese a pretext for invasion. It further appears from the report that the prime minister and his favourite set of officials both in the Army and in the Intelligence establishment were flawed in their assessment. In fact, the opinion of these officials close to the prime minister had cost this country heavily. The unpreparedness of the Armed forces is writ large in the contents of the report. Was a Himalayan blunder of 1962, in fact, a Nehruvian blunder? The leaked contents of the report serve as a lesson for us today. How prepared are we in our military strategy? Contemporary evidence indicates that our defence procurement has suffered. This adversely hurts our armed forces who are professional amongst the best in the world. Are we willing to learn lessons from 1962?”. However, soon after the BJP came to power and Jaitley became the defence minister he stressed that the Henderson-Brooks report “is a top-secret document and has not been declassified so far. The release of this report, fully or partially, or disclosure of any information related to this report, would not be in national interest”.Recollections by survivors of the 1962 battles make veteran’s blood boil. It is because these recollections rub in the fact of how clueless and callous leaders like Nehru and Krishna Menon were and how their impractical orders were followed by Indian officers and soldiers with utmost bravery, often knowing that they would not survive. As Major General Ian Cardozo (retd) recounts in Param Vir Chakra: Our Heroes in Battle: “Every single man of this company was found dead in his trench with several bullet or splinter wounds. The two-inch mortar man died with a bomb still in his hand. The medical orderly had a syringe and a bandage in his hand when a Chinese bullet killed him. A dozen bodies of Ahirs (this was an all Ahir battalion of the Kumaon Regiment-all plainsmen unlike the Kumaonis) were found outside their trenches indicating that they had in turn attacked the attacking Chinese when they were killed.”  Of the 1,000 mortar bombs with them, 993 had been fired. The mortar detachment personnel were readying to fire the other seven when they were killed. The end of this war saw Nehru, who had for long deceived the Parliament and the nation, a “broken man”. Too little, too late, he had to sack Krishna Menon. This book is an important trail-brazing reference base for further research by China watchers and a must read for all government leaders and officials dealing with national security.last_img read more

Read More »